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Manufacturing

Pioneer in Obsolescence Management and Legacy Sustainment for embedded technology

  • What is PLM+™ ?

    What is PLM+™ ?

    PLM+ is GDCA’s targeted approach to legacy sustainment, developed over decades by working closely with board and application OEMs. The process offers a new organizational structure to legacy sustainment, a time-tested way of being prepared. Traditional PLM (product lifecycle management) doesn’t address the intricacies of indefinitely sustaining legacy equipment after EOL. Traditional PLM leaves out […]

  • Legacy Manufacturing: Where Discontinued Embedded Boards Still Have a Future

    Legacy Manufacturing: Where Discontinued Embedded Boards Still Have a Future

    With technology advancing at lightning speed and embedded boards being EOL’d  sometimes even while a system is still in the design phase, new methods and ways of thinking must be introduced to meet the needs of programs and applications with long lifecycles. When embedded boards become obsolete, a Legacy Manufacturer can step in and provide […]

  • What is a Legacy Equipment Manufacturer (LEM)?

    What is a Legacy Equipment Manufacturer (LEM)?

    Once your electronic embedded board has reached EOL, but your system still needs to be viable, you will want to talk with an experienced equipment manufacturer that specializes in legacy sustainment. A Legacy Equipment Manufacturer (LEM) is a specialized embedded board producer that supports and services embedded board level products after OEM’s are no longer […]

  • GDCA: Pioneers in Proactive Obsolescence Management

    GDCA: Pioneers in Proactive Obsolescence Management

    GDCA’s unique approach to manufacturing is driving the future of the Legacy electronics industry. We work together with our OEM partners to provide our customers with proactive obsolescence management and remanufacturing for commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) products. Scrambling for parts should not come as a surprise in the life span of your machine and should be planned […]

  • Counterfeits  Take To the Road

    Counterfeits Take To the Road

    Those who have been keeping up know the threat counterfeiting poses to the embedded world. To this point, most of our conversations regarding counterfeits have been focused on the damage they can do to projects, the costs incurred to replace them, and the threat they pose to the security of the supply chain. However, there is still the basic, personal way they continue to threaten us—the real and direct danger to us and our families as we go about the day-to-day business of driving from place to place. Counterfeit tires are on the road, and they are less safe and of lower quality than the products they pretend to be.

  • Microgrid Death Spiral: The Argument Over “Obsolete” Power Infrastructure

    Microgrid Death Spiral: The Argument Over “Obsolete” Power Infrastructure

    In January of 2013, the Edison Electric Institute released a report titled “Disruptive Challenges: Financial Implications and Strategic Responses to a Changing Retail Electric Business”, which outlined a variety of challenges traditional power utilities will face in the upcoming years. The current power infrastructure in the United States wasn’t constructed with end-user power generation in mind, so the increasing power independence of households and businesses creates threats of “irreparable damages to revenues and growth prospects.” Chief among new technologies are advanced renewable energy sources, including solar, and the growth of grid-independent distributed power generators, aka microgrids.

  • Counterfeit Components Hurt More Than Military Applications

    Counterfeit Components Hurt More Than Military Applications

    When reading the news around counterfeit components, much of the dialogue is driven by the defense industry. When you are dealing with systems that protect our national security and the lives of the people out in the field – you’re not dealing with counterfeits in a bunch of trivial electronics. You’re taking necessary steps to protect the lives of men and women who depend on the systems for their safety. Since 2011 more than 1800 cases of counterfeit components were reported in defense applications, including mission computers operating the THAAD missile system, in the Air Force’s C-27J, in the Navy’s P-8A, and in electromagnetic interference filters on an SH-60B helicopter.

    However, the trouble with counterfeits isn’t limited to the defense industry and the military. They’re just currently the ones driving the conversation and legislation such as the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act, Sec. 818.

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